Successful Epsilon Rocket Launch in Japan

Successful Epsilon Rocket Launch in Japan

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) launched, on September 14 at 2 PM, the first Epsilon rocket at the Uchinoura Space Center in Kimotsuki, Kagoshima Prefecture. It successfully put a satellite into orbit about one hour later. It is the first launch of a new Japanese rocket in 12 years, following that of the H-IIA in 2001. The launch was originally scheduled for 1:45 PM but was delayed because a ship was sailing in waters near the space centre.

Epsilon Rocket Launch

The principal goal of the Epsilon project is to cut launch costs in half by using artificial intelligence and streamlining rocket assembly. The rocket had been scheduled to launch in August, but it was postponed at the last minute due to communication trouble between the rocket and the control room.

The new solid-fuel rocket was developed by JAXA and IHI Corp. The Epsilon is the world’s first rocket designed to carry out many of its own status checks using artificial intelligence. The autonomous monitoring system sends data to the control room. The Epsilon can be launched with just three engineers using two PCs, instead of the usual 100 technicians.

For the full report of the Science & Technology Office Tokyo, please follow this link:

Successful Epsilon Rocket Launch in Japan

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